April 2023 Newsletter

Study Spotlight: 

Eicosanoid lipidome activation in post-mortem brain tissues of individuals with APOE4 and Alzheimer’s dementia

We’re excited to share a recent study that investigates how the activation of the eicosanoid lipidome differs in individuals with APOE4 and Alzheimer’s dementia. This study was a collaboration between the teams of Dr. Stan Louie and Dr. Hussein Yassine, with tissue samples provided by the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center in Chicago, IL.  

Eicosanoids, which break down products of fat molecules, are important for our body’s normal functions like pain and inflammation, but can too much of them lead to diseases like Alzheimer’s? The study used brain tissue samples from people who passed away to look at how eicosanoids differ in healthy and diseased brains. They found that people with Alzheimer’s had higher levels of eicosanoids in their brains than people without the disease.

The researchers were also interested in how eicosanoids affected people with the APOE4 gene—this gene is linked to a higher chance of getting Alzheimer’s. They found that people with the gene had even higher levels of eicosanoids in their brains than people without.

This study suggests that the process that leads to the breakdown of brain fat may have a role in causing Alzheimer’s and perhaps targeting them could help treat the disease. However, more research is needed to understand the best way to do this. It is also important to note that this study was done using brain tissue samples from people who had passed away, so more research is needed to see if it is the same for living people.

With all that in mind, a question arises, can lowering brain inflammation reverse the progression of APOE4 dementia?

Thank you and Until Next Month,

The Yassine Lab

To find publications and learn more, please visit: yassinelab.com

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